Everest North Face

The Tibetan name for Mount Everest is “Chomolangma” which means “Saint Mother”. It has been in common use by Tibetans for centuries (BEFORE 1733 A.D). The height of Everest is 8848m. It was after the years and years of calculation and was announced by GREAT TRIGONOMETRIC SURVEY OF INDIA in 1856.

This peak was previously know as Peak XV to the western world. Then In 1865, Everest was given its official English name by Andrew wough. He was the British surveyor General of India. He recommended this name after his ancestor former chief, Sir George Everest. Andrew was send to Nepal by Sir George Everest for study of the peak.Only in the early 1960s, the Nepalese government gave Mount Everest the official name “sagarmatha”. There are 15 recognized route for climbing Mt. Everest.

Mt. Lhakpa Ri

Lhakpa ri one of several peaks that line the east flank of the East Rongbuk Glacier. The summit is a prominent three-sided pyramid which drops to the East Rongbuk Glacier to the west, the Kharta Glacier to the east and falls steeply to a tributary glacier of the Kangshung to the south. The slopes from the Rongbuk an Kharta Glaciers are relatively low angled and are linked by the Lhakpa La pass (6,849m), which is just to the north of Lhakpa Ri. It was from this pass, in 1922, that Mallory and his team mates first saw the East Rongbuk Glacier, an event well documented in mountaineering annals. The most climbable 7,000m peak in the world ! Lhakpa Ri is an ideal objective, remarkably positioned just across the glacier from Everest. It shares the historic route up the East Rongbuk Glacier and is climbable by a relatively safe and straightforward route. It is just over the milestone altitude of 7,000m, making it higher than anything outside Asia and is probably the most climbable 7,000m peak in the world.

Mt. Shishapangma (Zhangmu Via Kodari)

Shishapangma officially know as Xixiabangma is the fourteenth highest mountain in the world and the lowest of the eight-thousanders mountains. It was the last 8,000 meter peak to be climbed, due to its location entirely within Tibet and the restrictions on outside visitation to the region imposed by the Chinese during the 1950s and later. The mountain has two summits, the commonly climbed Central summit that the Chinese say is 8013m (7999m on old maps) which we have reached four times. Naturally, we will be aiming to climb to the higher true summit, 8027m (26,335ft), let’s see if we can get there.

Before the Chinese opened Tibet to western mountaineers in 1978, little was known about Shishapangma. The only 8,000m peak to lie entirely in Tibet, it lies tantalizingly close to the Nepalese border, shrouded behind the great, but less high, border peaks of Langtang. Enterprising individuals sought mere glimpses of it during the period that other 8,000m peaks were receiving their first ascents! It is perhaps not surprising that it was the last of the 8,000m peaks to be climbed. Not that its ascent by the North-West Ridge presents any great difficulty. On the contrary, it is now regarded as one of the most straightforward 8,000m climbs and its summit is frequently achieved.

Regarded as a ‘holy’ mountain by the local Tibetan population, and lying on the route to Mt. Kailash, Shishapangma continues to baffle us. Historians cannot fathom her names – Shishapangma, Xixabangma, Gosainthan. Yet, the mountain is perhaps the most accessible of her genre, rising only a few miles west of the Kathmandu-Lhasa Highway. It was 16 years before the mountain received its second ascent, by a West German team in 1980, and it has been climbed every year since.